A Guide to MOT Certificates – Brakes, Tyres and Windscreen Wipers for Road Safety

in Vehicle

 

Every motor vehicle over the age of three years is required by law to have a valid MOT certificate. MOT stands for Ministry of Transport. The purpose of an MOT certificate is to prove that the vehicle is safe and road worthy. The DVLA has a computerised record of every vehicle on the roads and police can carry out checks at any point. All vehicles need a valid MOT certificate in order to obtain road tax from the Post Office. Any vehicle that is without road tax will be flagged up, found and fined or towed away. An MOT certificate is the responsibility of all motor vehicle owners. 
 
Brakes are checked during the MOT on a roller tester and any issues such as pads, discs, callipers, pipes or fluid will be detected and the vehicle will need to be fixed accordingly. 
 
Tyres are very important – if they are not within the legal limits you could end up with a total of twelve points on your licence, equal to three for each tyre that is worn out. The safety aspect is also a great concern as a vehicle cannot stop efficiently with worn tyres. An accident could arise because of worn treads on the tyres of a vehicle. 
 
Lights must be working to their full ability – lights are important for the visibility of the vehicle by other road users. Indicators and brake lights must be working for safety on busy roads. 
 
Windscreens must be clear of cracks, chips or damage.
Most windscreens are covered by the insurance on the vehicle and because of this it is important to repair any chips as they appear – this will be free under the insurance and will not affect your no-claims. Windscreen wipers and washer bottles must be in good working order. Chips in windscreens could turn into huge cracks if left alone. 
 
Steering and suspension are checked and this is one of the areas your vehicle could possibly fail because of the amount of damage to our roads from bad winters or the amount of speed bumps. Bearings, split pins or CV boots and other associated components often need to be replaced.
 
Exhausts should be complete and not deteriorating; emissions should also be within the correct parameters. Fuel systems are checked for leaks, damage and to ensure that they are fixed on with no corrosion. 
 
General corrosion of the vehicle must be checked, this is when older vehicles may fail. Bodywork can be fixed or replaced if necessary and corrosion underneath the vehicle can be welded to make safe. 
 
There are some other points that must all be checked for safety including the licence plate, tow bar, horn, bonnet, catch, doors, seat belts and mirrors. When all items have been checked off the list an MOT certificate will be issued for the period of a year.
Author Box
A McKie has 477 articles online and 1 fans

 

More information about booking an appointment for a MOT to be carried out on your vehicle, please check with your local dealership. If you suspect you have any cracks on your windscreen find out about glass replacement in advance, windscreen wipers should be efficient in order to keep your screen clear – have the blades replaced once a year. 

Add New Comment

A Guide to MOT Certificates – Brakes, Tyres and Windscreen Wipers for Road Safety

Log in or Create Account to post a comment.
     
*
*
Security Code: Captcha Image Change Image
Related searches:

A Guide to MOT Certificates – Brakes, Tyres and Windscreen Wipers for Road Safety

This article was published on 2012/06/01